I’m Not Under Construction, I’m Under New Management!

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Seeing ourselves as a soul under construction, a disastrous wreck of a building whose only salvation requires the completion of an enormous and costly list of repairs, seems to me to be a very negative strategy to reach our purest and highest selves.

First, In order to begin, you have to spend countless hours surveying all that is wrong within you and itemizing all your past mistakes just to outline the proposed improvements. Then you have to figure out whether you can do the work yourself or whether you have to seek the help of professionals. And don’t even get me started on all of the budget implications!

Let’s face it, for most of us trying to do everything ourselves is what got our job site in the state it is today, so if I have to self help my way out of it, I’m probably in a whole lot of trouble here.

What if instead of considering ourselves under construction, we declared ourselves as being under new management?

The difference is that being under construction is a self help mode focused on all that is wrong with you today, whereas being under new management involves powerful leadership and assistance and is instead focused on that which you want to become.

I like this viewpoint better. It strengthens something that I know to be true but keep forgetting from time to time: I am not a separate being from the mind of God! I may have turned down the volume on his speaker, but it only requires a quick adjustment to have his guidance flowing back through my mind and my life.

What if every morning you could show up to your newly managed job site that is the creation of the new you, check in with the Superintendent, and ask him what he would like you to focus on each day? Wouldn’t that be better than being forced to address the entire project all on your own?

Let’s say when you show up to the work site that first morning, the superintendent advises you to clean up the dock. So you spend the day clearing all the clutter that no longer serves you out of your closets, mind, house, and life in order to make room to receive new materials.

Over the next week, every time you finish clearing one space, you walk by the cleaned rooms only to find them filled with mysterious wrapped parcels all vibrating with endless potential. You want to take control and start unwrapping them for use, but realize you don’t have the project’s final blueprints and intelligently decide to trust your Superintendent’s vision.

One day, he sends you with shaking legs to the top of the skyscraper where, upon hanging off one of the beams, you get your first view of the larger world around you. You look at the neighboring projects in their final state as they tower into the sky around you and realize how much potential there is for your project and that you have no idea how to go about it. Thank God for your Superintendent! Upon leaving that night, he takes you to the side and states, “You know what you saw today?” It’s going to be much bigger and better!” and he grins at your fearful and horrified expression and walks away.

You continue to return day after day, focusing only on the job requested of you and attempting to complete each task with a joyful heart and capable hand. Your mantra becomes, “Today I am going to do my absolute best.” Even on the days when you don’t understand the reason for the task, you do it anyway and gradually begin to see a pattern to even the most inconsequential of chores which brings you a happiness unlike you have ever known. Excitement and joy begin to grow in your spirit and you find yourself whistling for the first time in years.

Before too long, you find you are tasked with hanging sheet rock, forming new spaces for work and play, untainted by any of your former life. You are now meeting new people who are being specifically chosen to be on your crew to assist you in your project’s growth. You are a treasured part of a team and the camaraderie is both new and refreshing.

As you begin to suspect your project is nearing completion, the Superintendent asks you to go polish the windows and you grudgingly comply, thinking it is a stupid task and beneath your ability. But then you see with your polishing efforts that your windows now receive the sun’s light in a whole new way. The new space within glows with the light of something much bigger than you. It vibrates with love and harmony and joy. Tears stream down your face in gratitude. As you leave that night, you bow to the Superintendent in gratitude for the chore he assigned you that day, and he smiles.

Then out of nowhere and in the midst of all this peace, it happens. One morning you approach the Superintendent and instead of giving you a task he smiles and hands you a piece of paper with a new address and says, “It’s a job well done. Now you are ready to start your real work!”

“What do you mean? What did I just spend all these months doing?” you respond as your voice raises in a panic. And he replies, “That was just the beginning. As you have become less and less of what you thought you were, you have in turn become more and more of what I need you to be. And NOW we can REALLY get to work.”

It is then you realize that every effort to be better, every clearing out of the old to make room for the new, has lead to a broader vision, a higher purpose, and another chance to build something even greater.

You look down at the piece of paper listing the address of your new job site and at the bottom see that the Superintendent has handwritten a note in small print. “Congratulations, Foreman!”

Don’t worry you won’t be alone – I hear that project has a really amazing Superintendent too!